Growing By Species

white-elm

“Shiitake”    Lentinula edodes

Temperature ranges  50-80˚ F

Suggested tree species:

Tanoak (Lithocarpus spp.), Chinkapin (Castanopsis spp.), Oaks (Quercus spp.), Alder (Alnus spp.), Cottonwood and Poplar (Populus spp.), Maple (Acer spp. ), Ironwood (Ostyra spp.), Chestnut (Castanea spp.), Hickory (Carya spp.), Willow (Salix spp.), Sweetgum (Liquidambar spp.), Beech (Fagus spp.), Birch (Betula spp.), Eucalyptus spp., and Tupelo (Nyssa spp.).

“Reishi”    Ganoderma lucidum

Temperature ranges  70-80˚ F

This species requires specific attention to temperature and humidity parameters.

Suggested tree species:

Tanoak (Lithocarpus spp.), Oaks (Quercus spp.), Alder (Alnus spp.), Maple (Acer spp.), Sweetgum (Liquidambar spp.), Elm (Ulmus spp.), Plum (Prunus spp.), and Magnolia spp. For costal log incubation a greenhouse or sunroom is appropriate.  Logs can be partially buried in pots of sand to achieve moisture retention.

“Phoenix Oyster”    Pleurotus pulmonarius

Temperature ranges  65-75˚ F

Suggested tree species:

Oaks (Quercus spp.), Alder (Alnus spp.), Cottonwood, Aspen, and Poplar (Populus spp.), Maple (Acer spp.), Elm (Ulmus spp.), Fir (Abies spp.), Spruce (Picea spp.), and Piñon pine (Pinus spp.).

“Oyster”   Pleurotus ostreatus

Temperature ranges  55-75˚ F

Suggested tree species:

Oaks (Quercus spp.), Alder (Alnus spp.), Cottonwood, Aspen, and Poplar (Populus spp.), Maple (Acer spp.), Willow (Salix spp.), Beech (Fagus spp.), Birch (Betula spp.), Elm (Ulmus spp.), and Ash (Fraxinus spp.). Oyster mushrooms are vigorous and can be started at any time of the year.

“Maitake”  Grifola frondosa

Temperature ranges  50-65˚ F

This species requires specific attention to temperature and humidity parameters.

Suggested tree species:

Oaks (Quercus spp.), spp.), Maple (Acer spp.), Elm (Ulmus spp.), Beech (Fagus spp.), Honey Locust (Robina spp.), Blackgum (Nyssa spp.), Fir (Abies spp.), and Piñon pine (Pinus spp.).

“Lion’s Mane”  Hericium erinaceus

Temperature ranges  60-75˚ F

This species requires specific attention to temperature and humidity parameters.

Suggested tree species:

Oaks (Quercus spp.), spp.), Maple (Acer spp.), Elm (Ulmus spp.), Beech (Fagus spp.), Poplar (Populus spp.), and Chestnut (Castanea spp.). Lion’s Mane is not suited to paper-barked tree species such as Alder and Birch.  Stumps and partially buried logs are suggested.

“Nameko”  Pholiota nameko                         

Temperature ranges  60-75˚ F

Suggested tree species:  

Oaks (Quercus spp.), Maple (Acer spp.), Alder (Alnus spp.), Cottonwood and Poplar (Populus spp.), Tanoak (Lithocarpus spp.), Chinkapin (Castanopsis spp.), Ironwood (Ostyra spp.), Chestnut (Castanea spp.), Hickory (Carya spp.), Willow (Salix spp.), Beech (Fagus spp.), and Birch (Betula spp.).

Nameko is well suited to grow in oak and maple stumps.  Inoculated logs can be partially buried horizontally to help retain moisture. 

 

“Turkey Tail”  Trametes versicolor                         

Temperature ranges  50-75˚ F

Suggested tree species:  

Oaks (Quercus spp.), Maple (Acer spp.), Alder (Alnus spp.), Aspen and Poplar (Populus spp.), Tanoak (Lithocarpus spp.), Ironwood (Ostyra spp.), Elm (Ulmus spp.), Eucalyptus (Eucalyptus spp.), Apple (Malus domestica), Cherry (Prunus spp.), and other fruit trees.

 

Always be sure of proper identification of every mushroom before consumption.

Substrate Type

Substrate Type

Dowels

Sawdust

Grain

Logs

Shiitake, Oyster, Reishi, Maitake, Lion’s Mane, Nameko, Elm Oyster, Phoenix Oyster, Turkey Tail

Shiitake, Oyster, Reishi, Maitake, Lion’s Mane, Nameko, Elm Oyster,  Phoenix Oyster, Turkey Tail

Stumps

Maitake, Lions Mane, Chicken of the Woods, Reishi

Maitake, Lions Mane, Chicken of the Woods, Reishi

Straw

Garden Giant, Oyster

Oyster, King Oyster

Compost

Prince, Morel, Blewit

Woodchips/Mulch

Garden Giant

Substrates (Media used for mushroom cultivation)

Growing mushrooms can be a fun and exciting adventure. The process starts with inoculating substrates to grow mycelium , the threadlike structure of the fungus that digests the substrate. Here are some of the media that we recommend using with our mushroom spawn.   Be sure that the media you are using is fresh or properly dried and free of mold, mildew, or any other contaminants.

WHEAT STRAW

Wheat-Straw

RICE STRAW

Rice-Straw

Straw is a great substrate for Oyster mushrooms and Garden Giants.  A leaf mulcher or wood chipper can be used to shred the straw down into smaller pieces to facilitate mycelial expansion. Other agricultural waste can also be used depending on the mold and bacterial count.

 WOOD SHAVINGS / SAWDUST

Wood-Shavings

Sawdust and wood shavings can be added to mushroom garden beds or inoculated and used as spawn for log inoculation. Most species grow on hardwoods but some, like the Phoenix Oyster and Chicken of the Woods, will grow on pine and fir. We use alder wood shavings supplemented with wheat bran and gypsum for our Garden Giant mushroom kits.

WOODCHIPS

wood-chips

Woodchips can be added to mushroom beds as a food source that will sustain the mycelium longer than just straw or wood shavings. We recommend hardwoods like alder for growing Garden Giant mushrooms.

LOGS

logs

logs1

Logs are a great resource for home and commercial cultivation of your favorite edible and medicinal mushroom. Logs can be inoculated with plug spawn or sawdust spawn. 

 CARDBOARD

cardboard

Cardboard can be inoculated with mushroom stem butts and used as cardboard spawn. We also recommend using cardboard in your outdoor mushroom beds.

COFFEE GROUNDS

coffee-grounds

Coffee grounds, whether from the home or your local coffee shop, offer a free and already pasteurized nutritious medium that can be added to your straw to increase oyster mushroom production. Coffee grounds should be used fresh soon after brewing.

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Download our Tree and Mushroom Compatibility Chart